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No Christmas This Year

Hi, Sara here. Seasons greetings!

It has been a rough year, but I’m sure you don’t need me to tell you that. Christmas and other holiday gatherings are being cancelled in order to help stop the spread of COVID 19. It’s unfortunate that we cannot visit our loved ones this year. I would normally travel back to Ohio, but will be stuck here in South Philly instead.

The one thing everyone wants this year is just to see their friends and families. Wouldn’t we all gladly forgo physical gifts if it meant being able to spend time with loved ones?

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Invisible Plastic

Last year a member of my local Zero Waste group on Facebook asked if she should do bulk bin shopping in the context of living 20 miles away from the nearest store to offer it. Commentators on the post agreed that it probably was not a good idea. The additional miles driven would likely have a larger carbon footprint than the amount of plastic saved. 

I wondered if there is a way to express miles driven as a quantity of single-use plastic. Here is my best ballpark estimate:

1 mile driven = 5.3 standard size plastic water bottles

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Oranges can cure Christmas Consumerism

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

‘Tis the season to remember that most of the world is not Zero/Low Wasters. ‘Tis the season to remember that most of the world does not watch their plastic consumption. We are in the midst of the Christmas season that starts sometime before Halloween, and ends sometime after New Years Day.

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Yom Kippur and Climate Change

Yom Kippur is a Jewish holiday I knew little about,  but my son’s elementary school got off in order to observe the holiday. While I scrambled to rearrange my schedule so I could be with my son I decided to learn more about this fantastic holiday. Yom Kippur is the holiest of all Jewish holidays.  It’s communal repentance for sins committed over the previous year. It’s a day of abstinence from all kinds of things like food, sexual relations and leather shoes.

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The French Revolution and the Climate Strike

“Let them eat cake” is the most entitled line ever spoken in human history. Jean Jacque Rousseau wrote this line in his autobiography, stating an out-of-touch princess said this during a famine. He was actually referring to a Spanish Princess, but the angry French peasants in the late 18th century decided it was their Queen Marie Antoinette who said this. The reason that the french public so easily believed anything negative about  Marie Antoinette was because they were growing tired of her and King Louis XVI’s lavish spending. The problem was greater than just the monarchy. All of the French aristocrats paid no taxes, yet had immense power and wealth, while the poor continued to get poorer. This lead to the French Revolution, which at its core is a story of the poor trying to equalize power. It was a failure in some ways, as it eventually replaced the monarchy with another authoritarian ruler, Napoleon. Still, the French Revolution stirred up ideas and showed that the people will try to fight back if the rich continue to act too entitled.

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